Spotlight & Excerpt: Alien’s Captive + Giveaway

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I am thrilled to be hosting a spot on the ALIEN’S CAPTIVE by Tina Moss Blog Tour hosted by Rockstar Book Tours. Check out my post and make sure to enter the giveaway!

Title: ALIEN’S CAPTIVE
(Earth Brides & Alien Warriors, #1)

Author: Tina Moss

Pub. Date: October 26, 2021

Publisher: City Owl Press

Formats: Paperback, eBook

Pages: 180

Find it: GoodreadsAmazon

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All I’ve wanted since my abduction from Earth’s first long-range space flight is freedom from my alien captives. But when I’m sold off to a Rhonar warrior, I learn I’m not the only one enslaved on this hellish planet, and survival comes at a cost.

The dominant alpha alien they call Xelan may be my new master, but his fair dealings—and devilishly sexy charms—give me hope for the future.

If I can strike an agreement with the battle-scarred warrior, perhaps together we can change the destiny of those bound in chains.

And if I can’t—well, I haven’t backed down from a fight yet.

However, as enemies line up to destroy the alien warriors and subjugate the galaxy, I discover that the universe has a sense of humor.

Fated mates are real. And Xelan declares me his.

How can I attain my freedom if I’m tied to another being? Even if his possessive growls and single-minded attention ignite my desires in ways I’ve only dreamed, I cannot be his.

But how long can I fight the pull of a mating bond before I lose my head—and my heart—to the heat burning between us?

Only the stars know.

Alien’s Captive is a sci-fi romance launching two new series in the world of the Rhonar alien warriors. Will they find their brides? Steamy seduction, alien abduction, enemies-to-lovers, and a HEA guaranteed.


Excerpt:

AVA
I was inside Stella’s dog crate. And my head throbbed. Why those thoughts came to mind as I blinked my eyelids open? No idea. Slowly, I pushed aside the remnants of my messy bun to find a lump. Apple-shaped and tender to the touch, it had to be the source of my headache.
“Genius deduction, professor. What other gems did you glean from that?” I shook my head at the question, sending a fresh rush of pain to my temple and neck.
I hissed through my teeth. The pain sucked, but it distracted me. “Coping mechanism.”
My head throbbed harder. Yeah, that psych degree was paying off now. Nothing like self-diagnosis in the midst of a crisis. I sucked in a breath. In, two, three. Out, two, three.
“Okay, then, stop stalling and assess.” I’d already registered the cage. Thin metal wires twisted around each other like the threads of a fine woven rug. Except these strands created braided bars that ran vertical and parallel to each other. My face rested on the bottom panel where I laid in a tight ball. Metal beneath my cheek, metal braids around me. I sat up, jostling the delicate balance between numbness and blinding pain. It zapped behind my eyes this time.
“Damn it.” I chanced looking up. The crown of my head to the cage’s top panel was less than an arm’s length away. I reached for it, needing to know if it too were as infallible as it looked. My fingers grazed more metal.
Reality crept in. It’s edges toying with my senses.
I wasn’t in my sweet Samoyed’s crate. I couldn’t be. Stella was with my parents back on Earth. The big fluffy mush had wanted to come with me on the trip. I had seen it in my girl’s sad eyes when we had to say goodbye. But space was no place for a dog. I wasn’t even sure if it was a place for humans. But I wanted to find out. That was my goal in taking the job. After endless hours of researching the human condition, I needed to escape theory for practice.
“Yeah, you escaped alright. Look where you are now?” I bit my tongue. I could have taken that teaching position on the Big Island, one of Earth’s last paradise refuges after the atmospheric holes made most of the planet inhabitable. But no. I didn’t want to go back into the classroom. It was the mysteries of space for me. And now, where was I?
I stared through the metal bars. “Yeah, where am I?”
Darkness pervaded the space. I could make out a thin strip of light from under a doorway.
But even that seemed strange, as if the door were curved somehow. The air smelled stagnant like it had been trapped too long in one place. Well, I could relate.
So badly I had wanted to escape my humdrum life, to have a shot at a real adventure and maybe, even make a difference in the world. When the Unicus power couple offered me a seat on the first deep space flight, I didn’t hesitate for a second. Their company helped humanity’s survival, and they wanted me— me— to aid in the creation of an off-world colony. It was everything I’d dreamed. My civilization psychology expertise, sociology post-doc, hell even the old undergrad philosophy classes would come in handy. It was like I’d built my entire professional life for that chance.
And now, it was gone.
Tears stung the backs of my eyes, but I placed my palms firmly over my lids and refused to let them fall. You’re not done yet. Think!
I took another shuddering breath and tried to sort through my thoughts. The last thing I remembered was having coffee in the ship’s mess hall. We’d been about four months out at that point and past the solar system. The stars had appeared even brighter so far from home, and yet, they felt incredibly lonely. Like me. It had always been difficult for me to connect with others, preferring books to friends. But this trip had been an opportunity to connect with like-minded
people. The crew were efficient, and my fellow scientists, experts, and such were nice enough.
Still, I’d been…disconnected. It was like being an extra in a movie. Even when I had a speaking line, it rang hollow.
As I’d sat alone, sipping the caffeine elixir that forced a small smile from my otherwise glum mood, an alarm blasted through the ship. “All hands to stations. All hands to stations.” The mug had fallen from my grip, cracking on the table and spilling coffee all over the floor. I’d hopped back in time to avoid the mess on my jumper. Not that the solid gray one-piece wouldn’t be improved by some color. Still, I’d managed to get my feet under me and run toward… Where was I supposed to go?
Before I could figure it out, something hard and heavy slammed into the ship.
The impact sent me careening through the mess hall as the ship dove at a harsh angle. My shoulder collided with the bottom of the table, a ringing noise sounded in my ears, and then nothing.
Pulling at the front zipper on my jumper in the present, I angled the garment down my left shoulder. Mottled purple bruises ran almost to my elbow. I sighed and readjusted my clothes.
No matter how hard I tried, I could recall nothing more.
We must have been attacked. It was the only way to explain my current confinement.
As I came to terms with that realization, a burst of light from the curved doorway illuminated the space. I blinked against it, waiting for my eyes to adjust.
When they did, I wished they hadn’t.
A creature stood before me unlike any I’d ever seen. It had to be almost seven feet tall with a round body encased in an insect-like shell, long spindly legs, and four lanky arms topped
with lobster-style claws. My gaze traveled up to a face with a pair of antennas, wicked mandibles, and egg-sized eyes.
I screamed.
“Ceassse your whining, ssslave,” the bug-man hissed at me.
It took my mouth a half second to catch up with my brain, and I continued to scream, until… “I understand you?” Humanity had long been capable of translation technology. Babbler units were the most popular and often installed in the brain stem at birth with an adjuster function behind the right ear lobe. I knew all this, and yet, the sheer shock of comprehending this bug-man’s words tossed me to the stone age.
“It isss clear you do.” The monster stalked closer and opened my cage door.
Oh hell no. I shrunk to the back of the metal contraption, as far as I could get from the bug beast. I knew the possibility of aliens when I started the journey into space. What none of my fellow space travelers or I counted on were bugs-based aliens. I didn’t even like bumblebees, and at least they were important for the ecosystem.
Okay, I was spiraling. This was a panic attack waiting to happen. Breathe.
When that lobster like claw reached inside the cage, no amount of self-talk would keep the fear at bay. I screamed and did not stop. That didn’t prevent the creature from latching onto my ankle and pulling me through the opening. I grabbed at the braided bars, not caring for a second how they cut into my palms.
“Let go!” I held on with everything I had. It didn’t help.
“Foolisssh Terran.” Bug-man tugged me free like I weighed nothing. He dragged me toward the curved doorway and beyond, only releasing his grip after I’d been thoroughly caked in dirt. “Now, you will behave.”
I scrambled to my knees. Everything throbbed. My head had never stopped, and now, I could add an overall ache to the growing list of injuries. Trying to ignore my pain, I looked around to get a better idea of my circumstances. A translucent wall surrounded me in a full circle like a fishbowl of thick plastic. The ground was all dirt, and to the side the bug-man stood, calling in his loud hissing voice, “Special threats today!”
My brows rose toward my hairline.
He glanced at me, the bulbous eyes growing larger, and a sick smirk twisting his thin lips.
“Fresssh and rare!”
Nauseous threatened to bring up the coffee I’d had who knew how long ago. Tears threatened, starting at the corners, but I wouldn’t let them fall. Not yet. I had to think of how the hell to get out of this.
From beyond the translucent wall, another figure stood. Almost the size of the bug-man, I could make out his dark brown hair. He appeared to be more humanoid, but it was hard to tell as the fish-bowl effect of the wall distorted everything on the outside. Either that or this new figure was built like a pretzel.
If that was the case, I’d still take my chances with twisty humanoid over bug-man. I started to crawl toward the newcomer when the bug-man skulked toward me, his lobster fist raised. “You think to essscape?”
This time there was no stopping the tears or the cry that tore from my heart.
I was never going home.

***
DON’T STOP NOW! Be sure to pre-order HERE so you don’t miss the full story of the ALIEN’S CAPTIVE! Or join my Patreon and read it before anyone else!


 

About Tina Moss:

Tina Moss is a USA Today Bestselling Author of urban fantasy, paranormal romance, and sci-fi romance. She lives in NYC with a supportive husband and corgi Bear, though both the males hog the bed and refuse to share the covers. Her corgi Chuck now lives in her heart. When not writing, she enjoys reading, watching cheesy horror flicks, and traveling. As a 5’1″ Shotokan black belt, she firmly believes that fierce things come in small packages.

Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | TikTok | YouTube | Goodreads | Amazon | BookBub


Patreon Promotion:

Tina has a promo on my Patreon too that if anyone signs up in the $10 tier, they receive the eBook and a signed paperback. It runs until the end of October: here.


 Giveaway Details:

Tina Moss is giving a finished copy of the book to a person who subscribes to her newsletter.


Tour Schedule:

Week One:

10/25/2021

Rockstar Book Tours

Kickoff Post

10/25/2021

Two Chicks on Books

Excerpt

10/26/2021

The Momma Spot

Excerpt

10/26/2021

BookHounds YA

Guest Post

10/27/2021

Sadie’s Spotlight

Excerpt

10/27/2021

jaimerockstarbooktours

IG Post

10/28/2021

Angel’s Guilty Pleasures

Guest Post

10/28/2021

Rajiv’s Reviews

Review

10/29/2021

Don’t Judge, Read

Review

10/29/2021

Books a Plenty Book Reviews

Review

Week Two:

11/1/2021

Karen Dee’s Book Reviews

Review

11/1/2021

Coffee and Wander Book Reviews

Review

11/2/2021

More Books Please blog

Review

11/2/2021

_bookbound_

Review

11/3/2021

@curlygrannylovestoread

Review

11/3/2021

The Reading Devil

Excerpt

11/4/2021

@bookstagramofmine

Review

11/4/2021

The Phantom Paragrapher

Review

11/5/2021

#BRVL Book Review Virginia Lee Blog

Review

11/5/2021

I’m Shelfish

Excerpt

Spotlight: Neanderthals: the experiment, by Serag Monier

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neanderthals

Neanderthals: the experiment
by Serag Monier
Genre: science fiction romance

When a dream becomes all too real, a pair of strangers find themselves in parallel universes. Neither knows how nor why they’re there, but they found themselves in grave danger. Soon, the realities of their predicament come to light. They are being manipulated and used but by whom and why is yet undetermined.

As the pressures mount, their deepest fears, anxieties, and strengths are exposed and weaponized against them until they’re forced to make an impossible choice. Put to the ultimate test and facing insurmountable pressure at home, they must form a bond and hope their growing feelings for each other will help them overcome every obstacle. But first, they must uncover the truth about why they’re there and reconcile with who they are behind the carefully crafted facades.

“An often gripping tale of love and interplanetary survival.” —Kirkus Reviews

Amazon

About the Author:
Bio: Serag Monier is an Egyptian award-winning novelist, a plastic surgeon, and a lecturer in medical school. He was born in 1977 in a small town in the Nile delta in north Egypt. His home town was once called Buto, the capital of the ancient north Egyptian kingdom 5000 years ago.

Since 2014, he published four Arabic novels and one English novel which is a translation of an Arabic one. He is inspired by the long time he spent working with trauma and burn victims and by his reading in literature from diverse cultures. His last novel, A New Tale of Andalus, won the Sheikh Rashid bin Hamad Al-Sharqi Creativity Award in February 2020.

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Amazon

Spotlight & Excerpt: The Moreva of Astoreth + Giveaway

The Moreva of Astoreth

 

The Moreva of Astoreth
by Roxanne Bland
Science Fiction/Romance

Date Published: January 5, 2021

Publisher: Blackrose Press

Astoreth, the Devi Goddess of Love, demands complete devotion from her morevs because hearts divided cannot serve.

Moreva Tehi’s hearts aren’t divided. They belong to Laerd Teger.

And the price of her love could be her life.

Purchase Links

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

Kobo

BookBub

iBooks

Tolino; Baker & Taylor

Book Reviews

 

“Bland may very well be the Alice Walker of science fiction.” The reviewer is Vincent Dublado, Readers’ Favorite.

 

“This is perhaps the most entertaining science fiction novel I have ever read.” Rabia Tanveer, Readers’ Favorite.

Excerpt:

Chapter One

“I could have you executed for this, Moreva Tehi,” Astoreth said. My Devi grandmother, the Goddess of Love, scowled at me from Her golden throne in the massive Great Hall of Her equally massive É. Today, Her long, white hair had been woven into slender braids entwined with multicolored strands of tiny jewels. They sparkled in the candescent light radiating from the ceiling and the undulant, wall-height fixtures. Her golden eyes burned with fury.
Sitting on my heels, I bowed my head, not wanting to see Her anger. I stared at the black and gold polished floor, trying to ignore the trickle of sweat snaking down my spine. My unbound hair, white like Hers, hung over my face. “Yes, Most Holy One,” I said, trying to keep my voice steady.
“You blaspheme by not celebrating Ohra-Namtar, the holiest rite of the Gods. You were well aware that this was not Ohra-Sin, praising My role in creating Peris, but extolling all the deeds of the Great Pantheon in bringing this planet to life. Ohra-Namtar celebrates Our creation of the hakoi, and the worthiest, handpicked by Me and My Brothers and Sisters, celebrated with Us. And Marduc asked Me of your whereabouts. Your absence sorely disappointed Him.”
I shuddered in fear and loathing. Marduc, Lord of the Skies, was Astoreth’s twin Brother, and my grand-uncle. I’d been scared of Him since childhood, and even then made sure I was never alone with Him. I hated the way He’d stare at me when no one was looking, licking His lips as if I was a juicy piece of meat just waiting to be devoured. I had been too young to participate in the last Ohra-Namtar, and knew He would have been only too eager to get His hands on me during this one.
“Moreva Tehi,” Astoreth’s hard tone brought me back to the moment. “You are My acolyte. Your participation was not an option. By your absence, you did not share your body with Us, your brother and sister morevs, and Our worthy hakoi. You sullied the sacredness of Ohra-Namtar. What do you have to say for yourself?”
“I can only offer my most abject apologies, Most Holy One.”
“Your apologies are not accepted.”
“Yes, Most Holy One.”
“Where were you?”
“I was in the laboratory, working on a cure for red fever. Our four-year cycle will end this summer, and thousands of hakoi in the Gods’ cities and towns could die—”
“I know that,” my grandmother snapped. “But why did you miss Ohra-Namtar? Did you not hear the bells?”
“Yes, Most Holy One. I heard them. I was about to lay aside my work when I noticed an anomaly in one of my pareon solutions, so I decided to take a minute to investigate. What I found…I-I just lost track of time.”
“You lost track of time?” She repeated, sounding incredulous. “Do you expect Me to believe that?”
“Yes, Most Holy One. It is the truth.”
My head and hearts began throbbing, my grandmother probing me for signs I had lied. But She wouldn’t find any. Lying to Her was pointless, and Her punishment for lying was harsh. Swaying under the onslaught, I endured the pain without making a sound. After what seemed like forever the throbbing eased, leaving me feeling sick and dizzy.
“Very well. I accept what you say is true. I still do not accept your apology.”
“Yes, Most Holy One,” I said, panting a little.
A minute passed in uncomfortable silence. Uncomfortable for me, anyway. Another minute passed. And another. Is…is She finished with me? I prayed to be dimissed. But I wasn’t.
“What do you have against My hakoi, Moreva?”
I frowned. “I don’t understand, Most Holy One.”
“I have watched you. You give them no respect. You heal them because you must, but you treat them like animals. Why is that?”
The trickle of sweat reached the small of my back and pooled there. “But my work—”
“Your work is a game between you and the red fever. It has nothing to do with My hakoi.”
I didn’t reply. It was true. Discovering the cure was a challenge I’d taken on because no one since the dawn of Peris had been able to find one. It was a war, me assaulting the virus’s defenses, and the virus fending off my attacks. Our war was my obsession, and one I meant to win. And I didn’t care about the hakoi. I despised them. They were docile enough—the Devi’s spawning and breeding program saw to that—but they were slow-witted, not unlike the pirsu the É raised for meat and hide. They stank of makira, the pungent cabbage that was their dietary staple. From what I’d seen traveling through Kherah to Astoreth’s and to the És of other Gods, all the hakoi were stupid and smelly, and I wanted nothing to do with them.
But I wouldn’t—couldn’t—admit She was right. I wracked my brain, trying to think of something that wasn’t an outright lie. Then it came to me. “Most Holy One, I treat Your hakoi the way I do because it is the Hierarchy of Being as the Devi created it. You taught us the Great Pantheon of Twelve is Supreme. The minor Devi are beneath You, the morev are beneath the minor gods, and Your hakoi are beneath the morev. Beneath the hakoi are the plants and animals of Peris. But sometimes Your hakoi forget their place, and must be reminded.”
The Great Hall was silent. I held my breath, praying She wouldn’t probe me again.
“A pretty explanation, Moreva Tehi. But My hakoi know their place. It is you who do not know yours. You are the only morev in Kherah to have more Devi blood in your veins than hakoi, but that does not change your station, nor can you can rise above it. Your privileges—to freely move about Uruk without É authorization, to participate in the Gods’ festivals and games, to travel most anywhere in Kherah—are the same as any other of your brothers and sisters. And it is the morev who attend My hakoi. As a healer, you are not too good to minister to their needs, and you are surely not too good to celebrate Ohra-Namtar with them.”
I swallowed. “Yes, Most Holy One.”
“Look at Me.”
I raised my head. My grandmother’s expression was fierce.
“And that is why you let the time get away from you, as you say. You, Moreva Tehi, My acolyte of Love, are a bigot. I might understand if you were still a child, but you are not. You have done nothing to better yourself since then. Your bigotry is the reason you did not celebrate Ohra-Namtar. You did not want to share your body with Our hakoi.” She glared, as if daring me to contradict her.
I stared into Her golden eyes, wanting to deny Her accusation, but that would be a lie. I kept quiet.
She leaned forward. “I have overlooked many of your transgressions while in My service. I know you use your psi power to harass other morevs for what you perceive as slights. But I cannot overlook your bigotry, or your missing Ohra-Namtar. I will not execute you because you are too dear to My heart. The stewardship for Astoreth-69 in the Syren Perritory ends in two days. You will take the next rotation.”
My hearts froze. This was my punishment? Getting exiled to Syren? Everyone knew the Syren Perritory in Peris’s far northern hemisphere was the worst place in the world to steward a landing beacon. Cold and dark, with dense woods full of wild animals, the Syren was no place for me. My place was in Kherah, a sunny desert south of the planet’s equator, where the fauna was kept in special habitats for learning and entertainment. As for the Syrenese, they were the descendants of one of the Devi’s earliest and failed hakoi spawning and breeding experiments, and were as untamed as the perritory where they lived.
My throat tightened, and a tear formed in the corner of my eye. Eresh…he’s in the Syren Perritory now. I’ll be taking his place. It’s already been a year since I’ve seen him, and I won’t see him again for another year. Two years without my best friend…my only friend. What am I to do?
I managed to get up the gumption to protest, but didn’t. Challenging my grandmother would be disrespectful, and my punishment would be even worse than exile. It would also be futile. Astoreth’s word was law, and it had just come down on my head. “Yes, Most Holy One,” I said, my voice meek.
She leaned back on Her throne. “Mehmed will come to your room after breakfast tomorrow so you can be fitted for your uniform.”
“My uniform, Most Holy One? I will not be taking my clothes?”
“No. As overseer of the landing beacon, you are the liaison between the Mjor village as well as the commander of the garrison. Your subordinate, Kepten Yose, will report to you once a marun and you are to relay the garrison’s needs to Laerd Teger, the Mjoran village chief.”
“Yes, Most Holy One.”
“I will make allowance for your healer’s kit and a portable laboratory, but you are not to take your red fever research. I am sure you have other projects you can work on while you are there.”
“But—”
“No, Moreva Tehi. It is too dangerous.”
“I can take precautions—”
“No. I will not allow you to endanger the Mjorans. That is My final word. ” She gazed at me for a long moment. “You should also know that they, like all Syrenese, are not a forgiving people. They do not take transgressions—of any kind—lightly.”
I swallowed. “I understand, Most Holy One.”
“Good.” Her eyes narrowed. “One more thing. As the garrison’s moreva, you will lead the services in worship of Me, and that includes Ohra-Sin. Go now.”
“Thank you, Most Holy One.” I stood on shaky legs, bowed, and backed out of the Great Hall. Fleeing to my room, I fell on the bed and sobbed. It was bad enough to be exiled to the Syren Perritory and to spend another year without Eresh, but Ohra-Sin with the garrison? Only the hakoi served in Astoreth’s military. I felt dirty already. And not allowing me to work on my red fever project was punishment by itself.
A hand touched my shoulder. “Tehi, what’s wrong?” a worried voice said. It was Moreva Jaleta, one of my friendlier morev sisters.
“I-I’m being sent to the Syren Perritory to steward Astoreth-69,” I wailed.
“But why?”
I sat up. “I missed Ohra-Namtar yesterday and n-now Astoreth is punishing me.”
She gave me an unsympathetic look. “You’re lucky She didn’t have your head. Be thankful you’re Her favorite.”
I sniffed, but said nothing.
Jaleta patted my shoulder. “It won’t be so bad, Tehi. The year will be over before you know it. Come on, it’s time to eat.”

About the Author


Award-winning author Roxanne Bland was born in the shadows of the rubber factory smokestacks in Akron, Ohio but grew up in Washington, D.C. As a child, she spent an inordinate amount of time prowling the museums of the Smithsonian Institution and also spent an inordinate amount of time reading whatever books she could get her hands on, including the dictionary. A self-described “fugitive from reality,” she has always colored outside the lines and in her early years of writing, saw no reason why a story couldn’t be written combining the genres she loved and did so despite being told it wasn’t possible. Today, she writes stories that are mashups of paranormal urban fantasy, romance, and science fiction, as well as other speculative fiction genres.

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